Fall Webinar Series: Understanding bias

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In the third session of our four-part fall webinar series we’ll help you teach this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinars as well as the recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars. If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

October 28: Tips and Tricks for Integrating News Literacy in the 6-12 Classroom

Please join us on Thursday, Oct. 28for an important, free, day-long event, Summit: In Community, hosted by the School Library Journal (SLJ)The virtual summit seeks to highlight that community can mean a lot of things, beyond only geography. We all work and live in the context of community, and our interdependence has never been made more apparent than in our shared experience of the pandemic. 

Shaelynn Farnsworth, director of network expansion at the News Literacy Project (NLP), and Kelly Vikstrom-Hoyt, director of library services at The Overlake School in Redmond, Washington, and NLP’s 2021 News Literacy Educator of the Year, will present during the summit. “Tips and Tricks for Integrating News Literacy in the 6-12 Classroom” will underscore why it is essential for students to determine fact from fiction, fight misinformation and have the abilities needed to be smart, active consumers of news and information and equal and engaged participants in a democracy. Presenters will share various free, ready-made classroom resources and programs that all educators can use in a short lesson or an extended unit.  

Join this session to learn practical, hands-on ways to teach news literacy skills to your students. To learn more and register, click here. 

Please note that the event environment and the sessions have attendance capacity limits. If on the day of the event you find that you are unable to access the environment or join a session, please know that sessions will be available for on-demand viewing within 24 hours, and the entire event will be accessible for three months from the event date. 

Back to school Twitter chat, Thursday August 26th, 4-5pm EST

With school underway already in some communities and about to start in others, educators face another challenging year. The Delta variant and rising COVID-19 cases are on the minds of anxious students and parents. Best practices for navigating the 2021-22 school year’s obstacles, discussing current events in today’s polarized information environment, and bringing the critical skill of news literacy to all students are among the issues to consider as classes start again. 
 
Join the News Literacy Project on Twitter on Thursday, Aug. 26, from 4-5 p.m. ET, for a chat about all these topics and moreHear directly from education innovator Steven Andersonas well as members of our education team. Throughout the hour, we will ask eight to 10 questions related to the new school year Anderson, our staff and anyone else participating can answer using the #NLPChat hashtag. We’ll save the last 10 minutes for addressing additional questions from participants  feel free to submit them in advance by sending us a direct message on Twitter. 
 
To participate, all you need is a Twitter account. Then simply navigate to @NewsLitProject and/or #NLPChat at 4 p.m.  ET on Aug. 26 to join the 60-minute conversation.  
 
What trends are expected in education this year? What are best practices and resources for blended learning? How can news literacy fit into an educator’s curriculum, whether teaching in a classroom or remotelyWe’ll be discussing these kinds of questions, and more.  
 
As a reminder, all of our news literacy teaching resources, guides, quizzes and more are completely FREE to educators, along with membership in our NewsLit Nation community. Learn more about the many professional learning opportunities we’ve aligned with the start of the school year HERE 

edWeb Webinar: “Avoiding the Rabbit Hole: Teaching Concepts in Conspiratorial Thinking”

In this virtual edWebinar on Sept. 2nd, join subject matter expert John Silva and Shaelynn Farnsworth of the News Literacy Project for a conversation about conspiracy theories.

Register here for this free presentation at edWeb.

Conspiracy theories are becoming part of mainstream discourse and public awareness. From QAnon to pandemic-related beliefs to older ideas such as the Earth is flat, we are finding that more and more of our friends, family and loved ones believe at least one conspiracy theory. How do we teach students to avoid conspiracy theories without actually teaching them the specifics of such false beliefs?

This edWebinar explores the psychological and cognitive factors behind conspiratorial thinking, including the role of fears and anxiety, cognitive dissonance and biases, motivated reasoning and institutional cynicism. We will discuss the ways in which conspiracy theories exploit our emotions as well as fill our emotional needs. As part of the presentation, we will outline essential learning objectives and concepts and provide instructional resources for integrating these concepts into the curriculum, including our free, interactive lesson which is part of the Checkology® virtual classroom.

This edWebinar will be of interest to teachers, librarians, and school and district leaders of the middle school through higher education levels. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org) or John Silva (jsilva@newslit.org).

Kick off the school year with NLP’s fall news literacy webinar series

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

Session 1 – Teaching news literacy: Where do I start? Sept. 3 at 4 p.m CT

  • We’ll provide an overview of key news literacy concepts and essential questions to develop learning objectives for students to become reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying the primary purpose of information, understanding how news judgment is made, evaluating evidence and sources, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and recognizing the standards of quality journalism.

Session 2 – Exploring the misinformation landscape, Sept. 10 at 4 p.m. CT

  • Learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 3 – Understanding bias, Sept. 17 at 4 p.m. CT

  • People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In this session we’ll help you teach this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Session 4 – Using resources from the News Literacy Project, Sept. 24 at 4 p.m. CT

  • NLP offers a variety of free, ready-made classroom resources and supports to help you teach news literacy. In this session, we’ll help you get started with the Checkology® virtual classroom, an e-learning platform with 14 lessons and dozens of supplemental activities that you can use synchronously and asynchronously with students. We’ll also discuss strategies for using NLP’s weekly newsletter, The Sift®, with students, and we’ll take a tour of NLP’s educator resources library and the NewsLit Nation forum.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinars as well as the recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars.  If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

NewsLitCamp with The 19th*

NewsLitCamp  is an immersive, free professional learning experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) led by journalists and news literacy experts, designed to develop expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the news reporting process. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape and demystify what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Sign up today (it’s FREE!) to reserve your seat!

When: Aug 27, 2021 08:30 AM CST

Who can attend: This NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists in the U.S. Space permitting, we also will welcome school administrators, post-secondary and international educators.

Please email newslitcamp@newslit.org with questions.

This event is made possible with support from the Google News Initiative and is part of a series of NewsLitCamp events led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.

Peter Adams, NLP’s senior vice president of education, will discuss media bias and show consumers how to evaluate news coverage in a virtual presentation for the St. Charles City-County Library Current Conversations series.

People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In this session we’ll help you understand this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower you to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Register today.

Prior to the class, registrants will be emailed a link to participate. The link will include computer and phone call options. No account necessary! Can’t make the class? The recording will be available here after the class.

Join our Instagram Live with Axios reporter Sara Fischer

Instagram LIve Peter Adams and Sara Fischer

What happens when you bring together a news literacy expert and an experienced reporter who covers all things media? Find out during our first Instagram Live event!

Join the News Literacy Project and Axios on Instagram at 4 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 6, for a conversation between Peter Adams, our senior vice president of education, and Sara Fischer, Axios’ media reporter. They will chat for 45 minutes about everything from how to spot and avoid misinformation on Instagram to why misinformation — and especially visual misinformation — appeals to us. They will describe the real-world costs of misinformation and will discuss possible solutions to the problem, including steps you can take when browsing your feed and stories.

Viewers will be able to ask questions during the IG Live. No registration needed — simply mark your calendar for Thursday, May 6, from 4-4:45 p.m. and then hop over to the @newslitproject feed (and follow us!) to tune in. We’re looking forward to it!

What: Instagram Live

WhoPeter Adams (NLP) and Sara Fischer (Axios)

When: Thursday, May 6, 4 p.m. ET

Where: Instagram (@newslitproject)

 

Educators! Enter your students in our essay contest for a chance for both of you to win an Amazon gift card worth up to $100. Deadline now extended to May 15.

Student voice is a catalyst for positive change in schools and communities. For this reason, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, in partnership with the News Literacy Project, is hosting a writing contest to empower students to be civically informed and engaged.

LEARNING GOALS

  • Students who want to be part of the misinformation solution can use this contest to strengthen their news literacy skills.
  • Students will analyze different types of misinformation and show the ability to think critically about what is and is not verifiable information.
  • Students will have access to, and real-time feedback from, journalists in the field who report on these issues every day.

AWARDS: for each grade band 6-8 and 9-12

First place
$100 Amazon gift card (teacher and student)

Second place
$50 Amazon gift card (teacher and student)

Third place
$25 Amazon gift card (teacher and student)

**Winners will participate in an official Pitch It! session where they will share their article and receive feedback from a journalist.

ELIGIBILITY
Only students in grades 6-8 and 9-12 may participate with the support from a teacher.

LEARNING TASK AND ESSAY TOPIC
Students will review local and/or national headlines. See resources from the M-DCPS library which provides access to The New York Times, and articles on ProQuest. Or use any other available resources.

CONTEXT
News literacy is the ability to determine the credibility of news and other content.

Think about a widely reported current event and how news literacy skills could have been applied. Now, write a 500-1000 word article about a local, national or international story where having news literacy skills would have prevented misinformation from being spread. Use reputable sources to support your claim. Articles will be judged by a panel of journalists for accuracy, readability and creativity. Choose a prompt from below.

PROMPTS

  • Explain how the First Amendment protects freedom of the press.
  • How can citizens fact-check well-known figures (journalists, celebrities, influencers, athletes, etc.)?
  • Citizens have responsibilities. Why would consuming or sharing reliable information be a responsibility?

 CRITERIA

  • Clearly addresses the prompt.
  • Proofread.
  • Observation of rules for standard English (grammar, punctuation, mechanics) in writing.
  • Recognizable beginning (opening or introduction), middle and end (closing or conclusion).
  • Make sure you open strong. Readers will use the first few sentences to decide whether they will read the whole article.
  • Keep your paragraphs short. Popular articles tend to average three sentences per paragraph.
  • Thoroughly thought-out, tightly focused essays.
  • Originality.
  • End with a “call to action.” In the conclusion to your piece, encourage the reader to take some positive steps. For instance, if you’ve given readers a list of tips, prompt them to put some of the tips into practice.
  • Proper citing of sources.

ARTICLE FORMAT

  • 500-1000 words.
  • Essays must be the original, unpublished work of one student. Only the top two essays from each school for each of the permitted grade levels may be submitted. Schools should conduct their own essay contest to establish the top two articles for submission.
  • All articles must have a title.
  • All articles must be written in English.
  • Articles should be easily readable, 12-point font (such as Times New Roman) and double-spaced with 1” margins and numbered pages.
  • A cover page MUST be included with the following information: Student name, student ID, grade level, complete student address, best student phone number, the school’s name, the principal’s name, the teacher’s name, and best teacher’s phone number.

Consult the complete contest rules before entering.

Contest Deadline: May 15, 2021, 5 p.m. EDT 

Schools should submit their top two winning essays per grade band via email to: Ms. Monica Valdes, Miami Newslit Ambassador, mdvaldes@dadeschools.net

Columbia educators: NewsLitCamp® with South Carolina ETV and Public Radio and The Post and Courier

NewsLitCamp helps teachers and librarians develop expertise in news literacy, demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from misinformation.

News Lit Camp with South Carolina ETV and Public Radio and The Post and Courier banner

Join the News Literacy Project (NLP), South Carolina ETV and Public Radio, The Post and Courier, and Richland School District Two on May 14 and 21 for NewsLitCamp, a virtual teacher-centered professional learning event over two afternoons featuring breakout sessions with Columbia journalists.

Sign up today (it’s FREE!) to reserve your seat!

NewsLitCamp is an immersive, free professional development experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) led by journalists and news literacy experts, designed to empower you to teach news literacy.

This event is made possible with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and is part of a series of NewsLitCamp events led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.

Details

Educators in Columbia, South Carolina, are invited to join us for two afternoons of free synchronous sessions and live interactions with local journalists and experts from the News Literacy Project: May 14 from 1-3:45 p.m. ET and May 21 from 1-3:30 p.m. ET.

In early May, educators will be prompted to create a Sched.com account to access related materials and Zoom links. Sched will be the home base for all of the event activities.

Why attend?

As an educator, you directly influence how your students process everything they read, watch and hear. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape. Our goal is to help teachers and librarians develop expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the newsgathering process — demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Who can attend

This NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists in Columbia. Space permitting, we also will welcome school administrators and post-secondary educators. Please email newslitcamp@newslit.org with questions.

Bonus Session

You’ll learn about the Checkology® virtual classroom, our free, easy-to-use platform full of engaging news literacy learning experiences. Its 14 lessons can be used remotely or in-person and are easily integrated into variety of subject areas, with lesson topics like:

  • Misinformation.
  • The standards of quality journalism.
  • News judgment.
  • Watchdog journalism and its contributions to democracy.
  • News media bias.

About South Carolina ETV and Public Radio

As the state’s public educational broadcasting network, South Carolina ETV and Public Radio uses television, radio and the internet to enrich lives by educating children, informing and connecting citizens, celebrating our culture and environment, and instilling the joy of learning. It provides national and local content to classrooms via internet services Knowitall.org, LearningWhy and PBS Learning Media, along with teacher training and recertification in face-to-face and online settings. SCETV and Public Radio began in 1958 with closed-circuit broadcasts to multiple schools of French and plane geometry classes at Dreher High School in Columbia. Today the network comprises 11 TV stations, eight radio stations and a statewide tower network that serves schools, hospitals and emergency management teams.

About The Post and Courier:

As the South’s oldest daily newspaper, it traces its roots to The Courier, founded in 1803, and The Evening Post, founded in 1894. In 1926, the two newspapers were drawn closer together when The Courier, which had then become The News and Courier, was purchased by The Evening Post Industries Company. Both newspapers maintained separate news staffs until the 1980s, when those staffs were combined. In 1991, when it became apparent that reading habits were better served by a single edition of the newspaper – a morning edition – the two papers were merged to become The Post and Courier. The newspaper is now published by The Post and Courier, Inc. Its Columbia edition is reported, written and edited by Columbia journalists for readers in the Midlands.

Questions?

Email Miriam Romais, NLP’s senior manager of education and training, at newslitcamp@newslit.org or Katherine Templeton, Richland Two’s coordinator for professional learning, at ktemplet@richland2.org.

This NewsLitCamp is presented by the News Literacy Project and is generously supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

sponsor logos including news literacy project logo, etv logo, richmond school district two logo, knight foundation logo

Senior Planet OATS webinar: ‘Fact-Checking and Digital Verification’

Register here for this free webinar from AARP/Senior Planet OATS initiative.

Join the News Literacy Project and OATS Senior Planet for a free webinar to learn how to fact-check content and use existing tools to verify information before you share it. The discussion will take place on Wednesday, March 31 at 1pm ET / 10am PT.

In this webinar, we’ll share tips to help you understand the motivations of bad actors who push misleading, inaccurate and false information, and we’ll help you build skills to identify it and stop its spread. We’ll also teach you the basics of fact-checking so that you can protect yourself from falling for misinformation.

RSVP here to join us for this informative webinar.

Minnesota educators: NewsLitCamp® with Star Tribune, MPR News and Sourcewell Technology

NewsLitCamp helps teachers & librarians develop expertise in news literacy, demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from misinformation.

News Lit Camp with Star Tribune and MPR News banner

Join the News Literacy Project (NLP), Star Tribune, MPR News and Sourcewell Technology on June 15 for NewsLitCamp, a virtual teacher-centered day of professional learning featuring breakout sessions with Minnesota journalists.

Sign up today (it’s FREE!) to reserve your seat!

NewsLitCamp is an immersive, free professional development experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) led by journalists and news literacy experts, designed to empower you to teach news literacy.

This event is made possible with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and is part of a series of NewsLitCamps led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.

Details

Educators from St. Paul, Duluth and other Minnesota school districts are invited to join us for a day of free synchronous sessions and live interactions with Star Tribune journalists and experts from the News Literacy Project: 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1:00-3:30 p.m. CT.

In mid-May, educators will be prompted to create a Sched.com account to access related materials and Zoom links. Sched will be the home base for all of the event activities.

Why attend? 

As an educator, you directly influence how your students process everything they read, watch and hear. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape. Our goal is to help teachers and librarians develop expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the newsgathering process — demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Who can attend

This NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists in Minnesota. Space permitting, we also will welcome school administrators, post-secondary and international educators. Please email newslitcamp@newslit.org with questions.

Bonus Session

You’ll learn about the Checkology® virtual classroom, our free, easy-to-use platform full of engaging news literacy learning experiences. Its 14 lessons can be used remotely or in-person and are easily integrated into variety of subject areas, with lesson topics like:

  • Misinformation.
  • The standards of quality journalism.
  • News judgment.
  • Watchdog journalism and its contributions to democracy.
  • News media bias.

About Star Tribune Media Company

Star Tribune Media Company LLC is a locally owned, award-winning media company serving Minnesota and the upper Midwest. With the most-visited local news website, the third-largest Sunday and sixth-largest daily circulation metro print newspaper in the U.S., a range of home-delivered advertising solutions, and a growing portfolio of events, Star Tribune reaches more consumers than any other Minnesota media brand. For more information, visit www.startribunecompany.com

Questions?

Email Miriam Romais, NLP’s senior manager of education and training, at newslitcamp@newslit.org, Kate Indrelie, Sourcewell Technology’s education technology consultant, at Kate.Indrelie@sourcewelltech.org, or Ann Kaste, Minnetonka High School’s information and digital learning coordinator, at ann.kaste@minnetonkaschools.org

This NewsLitCamp is presented by the News Literacy Project and is generously supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

newslit camp Minnesota sponsors, including NLP, Star Tribune, MPR News, Sourcewell, and Knight Foundation