Public webinar: Productive conversations without confrontation

Free webinar: Productive conversations without confrontation

Trying to discuss current events with someone who has been manipulated by misinformation, propaganda, or even conspiracy theories can be maddening, deeply emotional, and seemingly futile. Before you react angrily or throw your hands up in frustration, take a step back.

Join us at 5 p.m. ET Thursday, Nov. 17 – one week before Thanksgiving – for a discussion about how to have a productive, civil conversation and retain your relationships. The event is free and open to everyone.

In this webinar, hosted by the News Literacy Project in partnership with the National Institute for Civil Discourse and Senior Planet from AARP, we’ll talk about how and why misinformation manipulates emotions and exploits biases to draw people deeper into false belief. Presenters from NLP and NICD will provide strategies for having a civil conversation about current events and resources to help you debunk these falsehoods in a productive way.

Register now.

Define, identify and debunk election misinformation: Join our webinars

As we head toward Election Day – Tuesday, Nov. 8 – many of us are hearing messages like, “Get informed before you vote.” But how can we be sure we’re getting information from credible sources? How do we know if we’re being informed or misled?

The News Literacy Project is hosting a series of three webinars – free and open to everyone – that will teach you how to find reliable information about the election, spot misinformation, and have productive conversations with people who have fallen for falsehoods.

Session 1: Are you being informed or influenced?
5 p.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 18

Our first session will cover the types of information sources we’re likely to encounter during election season. We’ll learn how to evaluate the purpose of the content these sources share, identify common types and forms of bias, and explore prioritizing sources that inform us by sharing information in a way that is fair and accurate.

Register here.

Session 2: How to spot election misinformation
5 p.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 25

Our second session is presented in partnership with the League of Women Voters. We will learn how to spot election misinformation and understand the motivations behind why it spreads. We’ll move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” and more precisely identify the common types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that we are likely to encounter in the runup to the elections. We’ll also learn fact-checking basics to feel more confident that we are sharing and acting on accurate, credible information.

Register here.

Session 3: How to debunk misinformation and talk to people who believe it
5 p.m. ET Tuesday, Nov. 1

Our third session, also presented in partnership with the League of Women Voters, will empower us to stop the spread of misinformation. We will learn effective debunking strategies and how to talk to someone whose beliefs are fueled by misinformation. The session will focus on how to have these conversations in a productive, nonconfrontational way that will hopefully yield positive outcomes.

Register here.

Even if you can’t join us live, register to get access to recordings of the webinars. And please share this information with your family and friends to help us spread the word!

EdWeb Webinar: Informed or influenced? Media and news literacy skills for election season and beyond

Thursday, October 20, 2022
5-6 p.m. ET/2-3 p.m. PT

On a regular basis – and especially around each election season – we’re overwhelmed with organizations, groups, influencers and others bombarding us with information. Much of that information is designed to influence or even manipulate, rather than inform us. How can you help your students cut through all the noise and prioritize information from credible sources?

In this edWeb webinar, join News Literacy Project experts and news literacy educators to learn how you can strengthen your students’ media and news literacy skills and equip them for active, responsible civic life. Learn about best practices for teaching about bias and the primary purpose of various sources, and discover how you can help students identify news and information that is presented in a fair and accurate way.

Register here for this free edWeb webinar.

The session will include presentations by Alexa Volland, NLP’s senior manager of educator professional learning, and news literacy ambassadors Jill Hofmockel and Molly June Roquet. Hofmockel is the teacher-librarian at West High School in Iowa City, Iowa. Roquet is the education librarian at Saint Mary’s College of California. Shaelynn Farnsworth, NLP’s senior director of education partnership strategy, will moderate.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

Webinar: STEM-aligned media and news literacy lessons for your classroom

Wednesday, Sept. 28
7-8 p.m. ET/4-5 p.m. PT

Join us for a free educator webinar to explore a trio of brand-new STEM-aligned Checkology® lessons! Topics covered in the new lessons include climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccines, medical misinformation, pseudoscience and conspiratorial thinking. The lessons support the development of science and engineering practices, such as analyzing and interpreting data, engaging in arguments for evidence and using mathematics and computational thinking.

Register here for this free webinar.

Checkology is a FREE browser-based e-learning platform with nearly 20 classroom-ready, expert-hosted lessons, as well as dozens of supplementary activities, exercises and challenges.

The new trio of STEM-aligned Checkology lessons includes:

  • “Evaluating Science-Based Claims,” which explores how to recognize science-based claims and evaluate their credibility. Students also consider why people deny science and explore science journalism.
  • “Be Health Informed,” which explores how to make sense of the health and wellness information vying for our attention. Students also discover how to avoid being misled.
  • “Making Sense of Data,” which examines how we create, interact with, and are influenced by data in all aspects of our lives. Students also learn how to evaluate the accuracy of data-based claims and visualizations.

During the webinar, NLP staff and subject-matter experts will provide an overview of the lessons. They will share teaching tips and best practices for incorporating the lessons and related activities into your curriculum. Don’t miss this opportunity to get a jump on your STEM-aligned media and news literacy plans this fall!

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

EdWeb Webinar: Memes, editorial cartoons, and visual journalism: Lessons for your classroom

Editorial cartooning is a powerful form of opinion journalism with a long history of effecting change and holding powerful individuals accountable. While the craft has evolved — even shaping contemporary forms of visual expression, such as memes — many key characteristics and functions remain the same. Hear from leading editorial cartoonists about how they approach their work, where they see their field headed and how the unique characteristics of editorial cartoons make for rich and rewarding news literacy explorations in a range of subjects, from history to social studies to art.

This edWeb webinar, sponsored by the News Literacy Project, features a panel conversation with editorial cartoonists Lalo Alcaraz and Signe Wilkinson, who are both included in “Power in Art: The Watchdog Role of Editorial Cartoonists,” an innovative new lesson on NLP’s virtual classroom, Checkology®️. The lesson, which was made possible with support from The Herb Block Foundation and the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists, examines the important role that editorial cartoonists have played across time and around the world. The conversation will be moderated by NLP staff experts Peter Adams and Darragh Worland.

Register here for this free presentation on edWeb.

Hear from editorial cartoonists Lalo Alcaraz and Signe Wilkinson; and NLP staffers Peter Adams, senior vice president of research and design, and Darragh Worland, senior vice president of creative strategy.

This edWeb webinar will be of interest to K-12 teachers, librarians, school and district leaders and education technology leaders. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

NLP Webinar: Get rolling with Checkology®: Discover new content and more

Back to school with Checkology

Join the News Literacy Project for an educator webinar introducing you to popular features and brand-new content on Checkology, a free, browser-based virtual classroom designed for grades 6-12.

Whether you’re returning to Checkology or new to the platform, this free webinar will give you everything you need to know to dive into teaching news and media literacy skills. Learn how to teach about social media, misinformation, data literacy and more this year!

NLP experts will:

  • Spotlight brand-new features and content, including just-added lessons on urgently needed news literacy topics, such as “Making Sense of Data.”
  • Discuss the educator registration process and explain how you can quickly build courses and assign lessons.
  • Share ideas for incorporating news literacy skills into your curriculum this school year.

All attendees will have a chance to win an NLP back-to-school educator care pack!

Register today – select the date and time that work best for your schedule. The recording will be shared with all registrants.

Contact:

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

Webinar: From Memes to Conspiracy Theories: Teaching “Misinfo 101” on Checkology

Webinar: From Memes to Conspiracy Theories: Teaching “Misinfo 101” on Checkology
Wednesday, April 27, 2022
4:30 p.m. EDT

Join the News Literacy Project for a free educator webinar focused on preparing students to fight back against misinformation! Learn how to use the “Misinfo 101” course on the Checkology® virtual classroom.

“Misinfo 101” includes two foundational lessons and four supplemental activities designed to help students develop a deeper understanding of misinformation, including conspiratorial thinking. The course will introduce techniques for combating mis- and disinformation, such as evaluating evidence online, digital verification skills and fact-checking.

Register now (it’s free!)

Learn from Peter Adams, NLP’s senior vice president of education, about today’s misinformation landscape and find out how you can help your students develop a deeper understanding of misinformation. Then, hear from NewsLit Nation ambassador Cathy Collins, a technology teacher and library media and technology specialist at Sharon Middle School in Sharon, Massachusetts, and NLP staff experts about how to assign, teach and customize the “Misinfo 101” course. There will also be time for Q&As about “Misinfo 101” and Checkology.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

NLP Webinar: Power in Art: Exploring a new Checkology® lesson

Join us for a first look at “Power in Art: The Watchdog Role of Editorial Cartoonists,” a brand-new lesson available through the News Literacy Project’s Checkology® virtual classroom.

Led by NLP staff and NewsLit Nation ambassadors, this webinar will provide an overview of “Power in Art” and show you how to use the lesson with your students across a range of subjects.

Adriana Chavira, a NewsLit Nation ambassador from Los Angeles and a journalism and photography teacher at Daniel Pearl Magnet School in Lake Balboa, Calif., will share tips on incorporating “Power in Art” into a journalism curriculum. Molly June Roquet, a NewsLit Nation ambassador from Oakland, Calif., and education librarian at Saint Mary’s College of California, will discuss how librarians and media specialists can utilize the lesson in their work with both teachers and students. Jordan Maze, NLP’s senior manager of educator network operations, will highlight how “Power in Art” can be used in social studies classes. Shaelynn Farnsworth, NLP’s director of educator network expansion, will moderate the discussion and a Q&A session at the conclusion of the event.

Register now (it’s free!)

“Power in Art” is an in-depth exploration of the history and impact of editorial cartoonists. Hosted by Lalo Alcaraz, an award-winning editorial cartoonist, the lesson examines how editorial cartoons have held those in power accountable, as well as other characteristics and functions of this important form of opinion journalism. (To access and assign “Power in Art” to students, log in to Checkology, or register for a free account at get.checkology.org.)

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

Webinar: Local News: Teaching with Storm Lake

Join us for an exclusive NewsLit Nation event focused on the award-winning documentary Storm Lake!

“Local News: Teaching with Storm Lake” is a free virtual Q&A with co-director Jerry Risius and a panel featuring Art Cullen, the Pulitzer Prizewinning Storm Lake Times editor. Additional speakers will include Jill Hofmockel, a NewsLit Nation ambassador and a teacher-librarian at West High School in Iowa City, Iowa, and Pamela Brunskill, the News Literacy Project’s senior manager of education and content. Miriam Romais, NLP’s senior manager of educator engagement, will moderate.

All attendees will receive limited-time access to Storm Lake for classroom viewing. Attendees will also receive a first look at an educational viewing guide for the film developed by NLP.

Register now (it’s free!)

Before registering, please ensure that you are a NewsLit Nation member. (Not yet a member? No worries – it’s free! Visit https://newslit.org/newslit-nation/ to register.)

About Storm Lake

Storm Lake provides an opportunity to teach students about the power of independent journalism and help them understand the crisis local journalism currently faces. Focusing on a family-run newspaper in rural Iowa, the documentary explores what it takes to keep independent local journalism alive, as well as its power to unite and inform diverse communities.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

NLP webinar: Lesson planning for your misinformation unit

Join us for a first look at the News Literacy Project’s new framework for teaching news literacy in this free webinar, which is being held in conjunction with National News Literacy Week.

Special guest Jay McTighe, co-author of the best-selling and award-winning Understanding by Design® series with Grant Wiggins, will help introduce the framework, which was developed using the Understanding by Design® template (Wiggins and McTighe, 2005).

NLP’s new teaching framework will help educators shape learning experiences so that students can independently use their skills to be smart, active consumers of news and information and equal and engaged participants in a democracy.

NLP experts will offer a deep dive into the framework, focusing on the development and use of essential questions in lesson planning. The team will discuss why essential questions can be beneficial as entry points into news literacy units, and explain how educators can incorporate them into their existing curriculum. The webinar will also cover NLP’s complementary programs and resources, including the Checkology® virtual classroom. The final minutes of the webinar are reserved for a live Q&A.

Giveaway: All registrants attending the live webinar are eligible to win one of 10 books co-authored by McTighe. The giveaway is sponsored by NLP.

Register now (it’s free!)

This event is part of the third annual National News Literacy Week (NNLW), Jan. 24 to 28, presented by NLP in partnership with The E.W. Scripps Company. NNLW raises awareness of news literacy as an essential life skill and provides educators, students and the public with easy-to-adopt tools and tips for becoming news-literate.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

edWeb Webinar: Tips and techniques for teaching news and media literacy

Join us at a virtual edWebinar on Jan. 24 for a discussion about best practices in teaching news and media literacy. Hear from four of the News Literacy Project’s news literacy ambassadors about the tips and techniques they use to teach this important lifelong skill. This webinar will be held in conjunction with National News Literacy Week.

Register here for this free presentation on edWeb.

Today’s information landscape — filled with “fake news,” misinformation and conspiracy theories — has become increasingly difficult to navigate, particularly for students. How can you help them develop the news and media literacy skills they need to identify, analyze and understand credible sources of information? What are best practices in teaching news and media literacy?

In this edWebinar, four of the News Literacy Project’s news literacy ambassadors will discuss tips and techniques for teaching news and media literacy — K.C. Boyd, library media specialist at District of Columbia Public Schools in Washington, D.C.; Dr. Cathy Collins, technology teacher at Sharon Middle School in Sharon, Mass.; Molly Roquet, head librarian at Redwood Day in Oakland, Calif.; and Monica Valdes, social studies and film teacher at Miami-Dade County Public Schools in Miami, Fla. Miriam Romais, NLP’s senior manager, educator engagement, also will join in the discussion. The ambassadors will describe how they engage their students in classroom discussions and activities that develop skills such as identifying credible information, seeking out reliable sources, and thinking critically. The conversation will be moderated by NLP’s Shaelynn Farnsworth, director of educator network expansion.

Attendees will also learn about NLP’s free educator resources for integrating news literacy concepts into the classroom, including the NewsLit Nation forum, educator resources, the Checkology® virtual classroom and the Sift® newsletter.

This event is held in conjunction with the third annual National News Literacy Week (NNLW), Jan. 24 to 28, and presented by the NLP in partnership with The E.W. Scripps Company. NNLW raises awareness of news literacy as an essential life skill and provides educators, students and the public with easy-to-adopt tools and tips for becoming news-literate.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

edWeb Webinar: Conspiracy theories, extremism, and TikTok: A conversation with a disinformation researcher

Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021
4-5 p.m. EST

Conspiracy theories, extremism, and TikTok: A conversation with a disinformation researcher

Join us at a virtual edWebinar on Nov. 30 for an important conversation about disinformation on social media with Peter Adams, the News Literacy Project’s senior vice president of education; Abbie Richards, TikTok disinformation researcher; and Shaelynn Farnsworth, NLP’s director of educator network expansion.

Register here for this free presentation on edWeb.

From QAnon to pandemic-related beliefs, conspiracy theories are increasingly part of mainstream discourse and public awareness. Many conspiracy theories take hold via social media such as TikTok, Facebook and Twitter, posing a particular threat to young users who can easily fall down rabbit holes and even get drawn into extremist ideologies. However, social media also hosts a number of influencers and resources devoted to combating misinformation and disinformation, including the popular @tofology TikTok channel created by TikTok disinformation researcher Richards.

Attendees will learn how to recognize conspiratorial thinking patterns and pitfalls and common strategies employed online by conspiracy theory adherents. They will also explore the connection between conspiratorial beliefs and extremist ideologies. Attendees will gain an understanding of the stakes posed by conspiracy theories and receive guidance on effective educational resources related to this topic, including Richards’s popular conspiracy theories chart.

This edWebinar will be of interest to teachers, librarians, and school and district leaders from the middle school level to higher education. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask Adams and Richards  about conspiracy theories, social media and best practices in teaching about this challenging topic.

Contact

Please email any questions to Peter Adams (padams@newslit.org) or Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).