Webinar: From Memes to Conspiracy Theories: Teaching “Misinfo 101” on Checkology

Webinar: From Memes to Conspiracy Theories: Teaching “Misinfo 101” on Checkology
Wednesday, April 27, 2022
4:30 p.m. EDT

Join the News Literacy Project for a free educator webinar focused on preparing students to fight back against misinformation! Learn how to use the “Misinfo 101” course on the Checkology® virtual classroom.

“Misinfo 101” includes two foundational lessons and four supplemental activities designed to help students develop a deeper understanding of misinformation, including conspiratorial thinking. The course will introduce techniques for combating mis- and disinformation, such as evaluating evidence online, digital verification skills and fact-checking.

Register now (it’s free!)

Learn from Peter Adams, NLP’s senior vice president of education, about today’s misinformation landscape and find out how you can help your students develop a deeper understanding of misinformation. Then, hear from NewsLit Nation ambassador Cathy Collins, a technology teacher and library media and technology specialist at Sharon Middle School in Sharon, Massachusetts, and NLP staff experts about how to assign, teach and customize the “Misinfo 101” course. There will also be time for Q&As about “Misinfo 101” and Checkology.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

NLP Webinar: Power in Art: Exploring a new Checkology® lesson

Join us for a first look at “Power in Art: The Watchdog Role of Editorial Cartoonists,” a brand-new lesson available through the News Literacy Project’s Checkology® virtual classroom.

Led by NLP staff and NewsLit Nation ambassadors, this webinar will provide an overview of “Power in Art” and show you how to use the lesson with your students across a range of subjects.

Adriana Chavira, a NewsLit Nation ambassador from Los Angeles and a journalism and photography teacher at Daniel Pearl Magnet School in Lake Balboa, Calif., will share tips on incorporating “Power in Art” into a journalism curriculum. Molly June Roquet, a NewsLit Nation ambassador from Oakland, Calif., and education librarian at Saint Mary’s College of California, will discuss how librarians and media specialists can utilize the lesson in their work with both teachers and students. Jordan Maze, NLP’s senior manager of educator network operations, will highlight how “Power in Art” can be used in social studies classes. Shaelynn Farnsworth, NLP’s director of educator network expansion, will moderate the discussion and a Q&A session at the conclusion of the event.

Register now (it’s free!)

“Power in Art” is an in-depth exploration of the history and impact of editorial cartoonists. Hosted by Lalo Alcaraz, an award-winning editorial cartoonist, the lesson examines how editorial cartoons have held those in power accountable, as well as other characteristics and functions of this important form of opinion journalism. (To access and assign “Power in Art” to students, log in to Checkology, or register for a free account at get.checkology.org.)

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

Webinar: Local News: Teaching with Storm Lake

Join us for an exclusive NewsLit Nation event focused on the award-winning documentary Storm Lake!

“Local News: Teaching with Storm Lake” is a free virtual Q&A with co-director Jerry Risius and a panel featuring Art Cullen, the Pulitzer Prizewinning Storm Lake Times editor. Additional speakers will include Jill Hofmockel, a NewsLit Nation ambassador and a teacher-librarian at West High School in Iowa City, Iowa, and Pamela Brunskill, the News Literacy Project’s senior manager of education and content. Miriam Romais, NLP’s senior manager of educator engagement, will moderate.

All attendees will receive limited-time access to Storm Lake for classroom viewing. Attendees will also receive a first look at an educational viewing guide for the film developed by NLP.

Register now (it’s free!)

Before registering, please ensure that you are a NewsLit Nation member. (Not yet a member? No worries – it’s free! Visit https://newslit.org/newslit-nation/ to register.)

About Storm Lake

Storm Lake provides an opportunity to teach students about the power of independent journalism and help them understand the crisis local journalism currently faces. Focusing on a family-run newspaper in rural Iowa, the documentary explores what it takes to keep independent local journalism alive, as well as its power to unite and inform diverse communities.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth.

NLP webinar: Lesson planning for your misinformation unit

Join us for a first look at the News Literacy Project’s new framework for teaching news literacy in this free webinar, which is being held in conjunction with National News Literacy Week.

Special guest Jay McTighe, co-author of the best-selling and award-winning Understanding by Design® series with Grant Wiggins, will help introduce the framework, which was developed using the Understanding by Design® template (Wiggins and McTighe, 2005).

NLP’s new teaching framework will help educators shape learning experiences so that students can independently use their skills to be smart, active consumers of news and information and equal and engaged participants in a democracy.

NLP experts will offer a deep dive into the framework, focusing on the development and use of essential questions in lesson planning. The team will discuss why essential questions can be beneficial as entry points into news literacy units, and explain how educators can incorporate them into their existing curriculum. The webinar will also cover NLP’s complementary programs and resources, including the Checkology® virtual classroom. The final minutes of the webinar are reserved for a live Q&A.

Giveaway: All registrants attending the live webinar are eligible to win one of 10 books co-authored by McTighe. The giveaway is sponsored by NLP.

Register now (it’s free!)

This event is part of the third annual National News Literacy Week (NNLW), Jan. 24 to 28, presented by NLP in partnership with The E.W. Scripps Company. NNLW raises awareness of news literacy as an essential life skill and provides educators, students and the public with easy-to-adopt tools and tips for becoming news-literate.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

edWeb Webinar: Tips and techniques for teaching news and media literacy

Join us at a virtual edWebinar on Jan. 24 for a discussion about best practices in teaching news and media literacy. Hear from four of the News Literacy Project’s news literacy ambassadors about the tips and techniques they use to teach this important lifelong skill. This webinar will be held in conjunction with National News Literacy Week.

Register here for this free presentation on edWeb.

Today’s information landscape — filled with “fake news,” misinformation and conspiracy theories — has become increasingly difficult to navigate, particularly for students. How can you help them develop the news and media literacy skills they need to identify, analyze and understand credible sources of information? What are best practices in teaching news and media literacy?

In this edWebinar, four of the News Literacy Project’s news literacy ambassadors will discuss tips and techniques for teaching news and media literacy — K.C. Boyd, library media specialist at District of Columbia Public Schools in Washington, D.C.; Dr. Cathy Collins, technology teacher at Sharon Middle School in Sharon, Mass.; Molly Roquet, head librarian at Redwood Day in Oakland, Calif.; and Monica Valdes, social studies and film teacher at Miami-Dade County Public Schools in Miami, Fla. Miriam Romais, NLP’s senior manager, educator engagement, also will join in the discussion. The ambassadors will describe how they engage their students in classroom discussions and activities that develop skills such as identifying credible information, seeking out reliable sources, and thinking critically. The conversation will be moderated by NLP’s Shaelynn Farnsworth, director of educator network expansion.

Attendees will also learn about NLP’s free educator resources for integrating news literacy concepts into the classroom, including the NewsLit Nation forum, educator resources, the Checkology® virtual classroom and the Sift® newsletter.

This event is held in conjunction with the third annual National News Literacy Week (NNLW), Jan. 24 to 28, and presented by the NLP in partnership with The E.W. Scripps Company. NNLW raises awareness of news literacy as an essential life skill and provides educators, students and the public with easy-to-adopt tools and tips for becoming news-literate.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

edWeb Webinar: Conspiracy theories, extremism, and TikTok: A conversation with a disinformation researcher

Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021
4-5 p.m. EST

Conspiracy theories, extremism, and TikTok: A conversation with a disinformation researcher

Join us at a virtual edWebinar on Nov. 30 for an important conversation about disinformation on social media with Peter Adams, the News Literacy Project’s senior vice president of education; Abbie Richards, TikTok disinformation researcher; and Shaelynn Farnsworth, NLP’s director of educator network expansion.

Register here for this free presentation on edWeb.

From QAnon to pandemic-related beliefs, conspiracy theories are increasingly part of mainstream discourse and public awareness. Many conspiracy theories take hold via social media such as TikTok, Facebook and Twitter, posing a particular threat to young users who can easily fall down rabbit holes and even get drawn into extremist ideologies. However, social media also hosts a number of influencers and resources devoted to combating misinformation and disinformation, including the popular @tofology TikTok channel created by TikTok disinformation researcher Richards.

Attendees will learn how to recognize conspiratorial thinking patterns and pitfalls and common strategies employed online by conspiracy theory adherents. They will also explore the connection between conspiratorial beliefs and extremist ideologies. Attendees will gain an understanding of the stakes posed by conspiracy theories and receive guidance on effective educational resources related to this topic, including Richards’s popular conspiracy theories chart.

This edWebinar will be of interest to teachers, librarians, and school and district leaders from the middle school level to higher education. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask Adams and Richards  about conspiracy theories, social media and best practices in teaching about this challenging topic.

Contact

Please email any questions to Peter Adams (padams@newslit.org) or Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org).

Calling all educators: Here’s your chance to learn how to teach news literacy!

The News Literacy Project, in cooperation with Village Consultancy, is hosting a series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and find out how to use resources from NLP.  This complimentary series for educators is supported by U.S. Embassy Singapore

All webinar times listed below are in Singapore Standard Time (SST). 

Session 1 – Introduction to News Literacy for educators of students at primary, secondary and junior college levels, as well as tertiary levels, on 29 October from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

We’ll provide an overview of key news literacy concepts and essential questions to develop learning objectives for students to become reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying the primary purpose of information, understanding how news judgment is made, evaluating evidence and sources, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and recognizing the standards of quality journalism.

Session 2 – Exploring the Misinformation Landscape for educators of students at secondary, junior college and tertiary levels on 5 November from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

In this session you will learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 3 – Digital Verification for educators of students at secondary, junior college and tertiary levels on 12 November from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

In this session we will explore the tools and skills students need to verify the authenticity of information and learn to create engaging fact-checking investigations that empower students to investigate and debunk viral content. Topics include developing critical observation skills to determine original context; learning to use reverse image searches to determine authenticity of photos and video; and using advanced search techniques on the web and in social media.

Session 4 – Exploring the Misinformation Landscape for educators of primary school students on 19 November from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

 In this session you will learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, even younger students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 5 – Digital Verification, for educators of primary school students on 3 December from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

In this session we will explore the tools and skills students need to verify the authenticity of information and learn to create engaging fact-checking investigations that empower students to investigate and debunk viral content. We will focus on how younger students can develop critical observation skills to determine original context and how students can use advanced search techniques on the web and in social media.

Fall Webinar Series: Using resources from NLP

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

In our fourth and final session in this series, we’ll offer a variety of free, ready-made classroom resources and supports to help you teach news literacy. In this session, we’ll help you get started with the Checkology® virtual classroom, an e-learning platform with 14 lessons and dozens of supplemental activities that you can use synchronously and asynchronously with students. We’ll also discuss strategies for using NLP’s weekly newsletter, The Sift®, with students, and we’ll take a tour of NLP’s educator resources library and the NewsLit Nation forum.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinar recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars. If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

Fall Webinar Series: Understanding bias

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In the third session of our four-part fall webinar series we’ll help you teach this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinars as well as the recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars. If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

edWeb Webinar: “Avoiding the Rabbit Hole: Teaching Concepts in Conspiratorial Thinking”

In this virtual edWebinar on Sept. 2nd, join subject matter expert John Silva and Shaelynn Farnsworth of the News Literacy Project for a conversation about conspiracy theories.

Register here for this free presentation at edWeb.

Conspiracy theories are becoming part of mainstream discourse and public awareness. From QAnon to pandemic-related beliefs to older ideas such as the Earth is flat, we are finding that more and more of our friends, family and loved ones believe at least one conspiracy theory. How do we teach students to avoid conspiracy theories without actually teaching them the specifics of such false beliefs?

This edWebinar explores the psychological and cognitive factors behind conspiratorial thinking, including the role of fears and anxiety, cognitive dissonance and biases, motivated reasoning and institutional cynicism. We will discuss the ways in which conspiracy theories exploit our emotions as well as fill our emotional needs. As part of the presentation, we will outline essential learning objectives and concepts and provide instructional resources for integrating these concepts into the curriculum, including our free, interactive lesson which is part of the Checkology® virtual classroom.

This edWebinar will be of interest to teachers, librarians, and school and district leaders of the middle school through higher education levels. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org) or John Silva (jsilva@newslit.org).

Kick off the school year with NLP’s fall news literacy webinar series

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

Session 1 – Teaching news literacy: Where do I start? Sept. 3 at 4 p.m CT

  • We’ll provide an overview of key news literacy concepts and essential questions to develop learning objectives for students to become reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying the primary purpose of information, understanding how news judgment is made, evaluating evidence and sources, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and recognizing the standards of quality journalism.

Session 2 – Exploring the misinformation landscape, Sept. 10 at 4 p.m. CT

  • Learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 3 – Understanding bias, Sept. 17 at 4 p.m. CT

  • People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In this session we’ll help you teach this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Session 4 – Using resources from the News Literacy Project, Sept. 24 at 4 p.m. CT

  • NLP offers a variety of free, ready-made classroom resources and supports to help you teach news literacy. In this session, we’ll help you get started with the Checkology® virtual classroom, an e-learning platform with 14 lessons and dozens of supplemental activities that you can use synchronously and asynchronously with students. We’ll also discuss strategies for using NLP’s weekly newsletter, The Sift®, with students, and we’ll take a tour of NLP’s educator resources library and the NewsLit Nation forum.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinars as well as the recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars.  If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.