Registration link: https://bit.ly/NLCBayArea2021

A virtual, regional, educator-centered professional development experience in collaboration with Local News Matters.

Join the News Literacy Project and San Francisco Bay Area-based independent newsroom Local News Matters on Nov. 22  for a virtual, educator-focused NewsLitCamp® led by journalists from Local News Matters alongside NLP’s news literacy experts.

This event is open to all educators throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, including those in Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma counties.

Questions? Email us at newslitcamp@newslit.org or visit us at newslit.org for more information.

This NewsLitCamp is sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight foundation.

Registration link: Registration facilitated by Detroit Public Schools. More details coming soon.

A virtual, regional, educator-centered professional development experience in collaboration with Detroit Public Schools and the Detroit Free Press

Join the News Literacy Project (NLP) and Detroit Public Schools on Nov. 2 for a virtual, educator-focused NewsLitCamp® led by journalists from the Detroit Free Press and NLP’s news literacy experts, designed to empower you to teach news literacy.

This event is open to all educators in Detroit Public Schools.

Questions? Email us at newslitcamp@newslit.org or visit us at newslit.org for more information.

This NewsLitCamp is sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight foundation.

NLP partners with We The Veterans to offer misinformation webinar

Misinformation and disinformation target all of us, with purveyors of falsehoods often exploiting our deeply held values and beliefs, including patriotism. That’s why the News Literacy Project is partnering with We the Veterans, a nonpartisan nonprofit created by veterans and military families, to present a free webinar, Exploring the misinformation landscape: Understanding how and why people believe false information, Wednesday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. ET.

We are honored to have the opportunity to reach this audience, but you do not have to be a veteran, active military or a family member to participate. The webinar is open to all.

In this session, John Silva, NLP’s senior director of professional learning and a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, will discuss how to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that we encounter regularly.

Silva will explore motivations behind different propagators of misinformation and different ways that they use our emotions and cognitive biases to manipulate us into believing something is true. In  addition, he will demonstrate key fact-checking and verification skills for identifying misinformation. By getting to a deeper understanding of misinformation, we all can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

About We the Veterans

We the Veterans is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization created by veterans and military family members, united for democracy and committed to building a more perfect union. Its mission is to harness the strength of veterans and military families to support the pillars of American democracy. We the Veterans unites private and public sector experts and leaders to find solutions to our country’s biggest challenges. The organization’s programming is designed to engage and empower the veteran community, supporters and allies to take action in their local communities and beyond.

 

Calling all educators: Here’s your chance to learn how to teach news literacy!

The News Literacy Project, in cooperation with Village Consultancy, is hosting a series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and find out how to use resources from NLP.  This complimentary series for educators is supported by U.S. Embassy Singapore

All webinar times listed below are in Singapore Standard Time (SST). 

Session 1 – Introduction to News Literacy for educators of students at primary, secondary and junior college levels, as well as tertiary levels, on 29 October from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

We’ll provide an overview of key news literacy concepts and essential questions to develop learning objectives for students to become reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying the primary purpose of information, understanding how news judgment is made, evaluating evidence and sources, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and recognizing the standards of quality journalism.

Session 2 – Exploring the Misinformation Landscape for educators of students at secondary, junior college and tertiary levels on 5 November from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

In this session you will learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 3 – Digital Verification for educators of students at secondary, junior college and tertiary levels on 12 November from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

In this session we will explore the tools and skills students need to verify the authenticity of information and learn to create engaging fact-checking investigations that empower students to investigate and debunk viral content. Topics include developing critical observation skills to determine original context; learning to use reverse image searches to determine authenticity of photos and video; and using advanced search techniques on the web and in social media.

Session 4 – Exploring the Misinformation Landscape for educators of primary school students on 19 November from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

 In this session you will learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, even younger students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 5 – Digital Verification, for educators of primary school students on 3 December from 16:00-17:30. Register here.

In this session we will explore the tools and skills students need to verify the authenticity of information and learn to create engaging fact-checking investigations that empower students to investigate and debunk viral content. We will focus on how younger students can develop critical observation skills to determine original context and how students can use advanced search techniques on the web and in social media.

Understanding Misinformation and How to Talk to People Who Believe It

A news literacy learning series for older adults 

The News Literacy Project is hosting a free webinar series Understanding Misinformation and How to Talk to People Who Believe It to foster more productive conversations free of misinformation among friends and family members and across generations — particularly during the holidays. The series is sponsored by the Fore River Foundation and is being offered in partnership with AARP’s OATS/Senior Planet program. John Silva, NLP’s senior director of professional learning, and Elizabeth Price, NLP’s manager of professional learning, will lead the sessions.

These free webinars will help participants understand what misinformation is, how people come to believe it and how to effectively and compassionately communicate and debunk those beliefs. While older adults play a critical role in sorting fact from fiction and helping others to do so, everyone can benefit from resources and support to help prevent harm from mis- and disinformation.

Session 2: Essential Fact-Checking Skills

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2-3 p.m. ET. Register here.*

Join us for the second installment of this webinar series. Dive into the tools and skills needed to fact-check and verify the authenticity of information as well as how to source its origins for yourself.
*This session is being held in partnership with AARP’s OATS/Senior Planet program.

Session 3: Productive Conversations Without Confrontation

Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2-3 p.m. ET. Register here.*
The holiday season is a great time to enjoy a meal with family and friends and reflect on all that we are thankful for. Unfortunately, for many of us, our dinner table may include those who have deeply held but completely false beliefs.  Once you have learned how to verify information, the next step is talking to someone whose beliefs are fueled by misinformation. We will focus on how to have this conversation in a productive, non-confrontational way in order to yield positive outcomes.
*This session is being held in partnership with AARP’s OATS/Senior Planet program.

In case you missed it:

Watch session 1, The Misinformation Landscape, which discusses how to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that we encounter regularly. The session explores how propagators of misinformation use our emotions and cognitive biases to manipulate us.

Coming up  in 2022

Please stay tuned for the fourth session in NLP’s older adult webinar series in January, during National News Literacy Week.

Fall Webinar Series: Using resources from NLP

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

In our fourth and final session in this series, we’ll offer a variety of free, ready-made classroom resources and supports to help you teach news literacy. In this session, we’ll help you get started with the Checkology® virtual classroom, an e-learning platform with 14 lessons and dozens of supplemental activities that you can use synchronously and asynchronously with students. We’ll also discuss strategies for using NLP’s weekly newsletter, The Sift®, with students, and we’ll take a tour of NLP’s educator resources library and the NewsLit Nation forum.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinar recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars. If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

Fall Webinar Series: Understanding bias

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In the third session of our four-part fall webinar series we’ll help you teach this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinars as well as the recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars. If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

October 28: Tips and Tricks for Integrating News Literacy in the 6-12 Classroom

Please join us on Thursday, Oct. 28for an important, free, day-long event, Summit: In Community, hosted by the School Library Journal (SLJ)The virtual summit seeks to highlight that community can mean a lot of things, beyond only geography. We all work and live in the context of community, and our interdependence has never been made more apparent than in our shared experience of the pandemic. 

Shaelynn Farnsworth, director of network expansion at the News Literacy Project (NLP), and Kelly Vikstrom-Hoyt, director of library services at The Overlake School in Redmond, Washington, and NLP’s 2021 News Literacy Educator of the Year, will present during the summit. “Tips and Tricks for Integrating News Literacy in the 6-12 Classroom” will underscore why it is essential for students to determine fact from fiction, fight misinformation and have the abilities needed to be smart, active consumers of news and information and equal and engaged participants in a democracy. Presenters will share various free, ready-made classroom resources and programs that all educators can use in a short lesson or an extended unit.  

Join this session to learn practical, hands-on ways to teach news literacy skills to your students. To learn more and register, click here. 

Please note that the event environment and the sessions have attendance capacity limits. If on the day of the event you find that you are unable to access the environment or join a session, please know that sessions will be available for on-demand viewing within 24 hours, and the entire event will be accessible for three months from the event date. 

Back to school Twitter chat, Thursday August 26th, 4-5pm EST

With school underway already in some communities and about to start in others, educators face another challenging year. The Delta variant and rising COVID-19 cases are on the minds of anxious students and parents. Best practices for navigating the 2021-22 school year’s obstacles, discussing current events in today’s polarized information environment, and bringing the critical skill of news literacy to all students are among the issues to consider as classes start again. 
 
Join the News Literacy Project on Twitter on Thursday, Aug. 26, from 4-5 p.m. ET, for a chat about all these topics and moreHear directly from education innovator Steven Andersonas well as members of our education team. Throughout the hour, we will ask eight to 10 questions related to the new school year Anderson, our staff and anyone else participating can answer using the #NLPChat hashtag. We’ll save the last 10 minutes for addressing additional questions from participants  feel free to submit them in advance by sending us a direct message on Twitter. 
 
To participate, all you need is a Twitter account. Then simply navigate to @NewsLitProject and/or #NLPChat at 4 p.m.  ET on Aug. 26 to join the 60-minute conversation.  
 
What trends are expected in education this year? What are best practices and resources for blended learning? How can news literacy fit into an educator’s curriculum, whether teaching in a classroom or remotelyWe’ll be discussing these kinds of questions, and more.  
 
As a reminder, all of our news literacy teaching resources, guides, quizzes and more are completely FREE to educators, along with membership in our NewsLit Nation community. Learn more about the many professional learning opportunities we’ve aligned with the start of the school year HERE 

edWeb Webinar: “Avoiding the Rabbit Hole: Teaching Concepts in Conspiratorial Thinking”

In this virtual edWebinar on Sept. 2nd, join subject matter expert John Silva and Shaelynn Farnsworth of the News Literacy Project for a conversation about conspiracy theories.

Register here for this free presentation at edWeb.

Conspiracy theories are becoming part of mainstream discourse and public awareness. From QAnon to pandemic-related beliefs to older ideas such as the Earth is flat, we are finding that more and more of our friends, family and loved ones believe at least one conspiracy theory. How do we teach students to avoid conspiracy theories without actually teaching them the specifics of such false beliefs?

This edWebinar explores the psychological and cognitive factors behind conspiratorial thinking, including the role of fears and anxiety, cognitive dissonance and biases, motivated reasoning and institutional cynicism. We will discuss the ways in which conspiracy theories exploit our emotions as well as fill our emotional needs. As part of the presentation, we will outline essential learning objectives and concepts and provide instructional resources for integrating these concepts into the curriculum, including our free, interactive lesson which is part of the Checkology® virtual classroom.

This edWebinar will be of interest to teachers, librarians, and school and district leaders of the middle school through higher education levels. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Contact

Please email any questions to Shaelynn Farnsworth (sfarnsworth@newslit.org) or John Silva (jsilva@newslit.org).

Kick off the school year with NLP’s fall news literacy webinar series

The News Literacy Project is hosting a four-part series of professional learning webinars focused on essential news literacy concepts. In these sessions, educators will learn about these concepts, discuss curriculum integration and how to use resources from the News Literacy Project. This series is free for educators.

Session 1 – Teaching news literacy: Where do I start? Sept. 3 at 4 p.m CT

  • We’ll provide an overview of key news literacy concepts and essential questions to develop learning objectives for students to become reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying the primary purpose of information, understanding how news judgment is made, evaluating evidence and sources, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and recognizing the standards of quality journalism.

Session 2 – Exploring the misinformation landscape, Sept. 10 at 4 p.m. CT

  • Learn how to teach students to move beyond the unhelpful term “fake news” to more precisely identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter. We will discuss NLP’s taxonomy for five different types of misinformation, explore motivations behind different types of propagators of misinformation, discuss ways people are manipulated through emotions and cognitive biases and examine effective debunking strategies. By teaching a deeper understanding of misinformation, students can become less susceptible to it and more likely to prioritize reliable, verified sources of news and information.

Session 3 – Understanding bias, Sept. 17 at 4 p.m. CT

  • People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In this session we’ll help you teach this vital, controversial, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Session 4 – Using resources from the News Literacy Project, Sept. 24 at 4 p.m. CT

  • NLP offers a variety of free, ready-made classroom resources and supports to help you teach news literacy. In this session, we’ll help you get started with the Checkology® virtual classroom, an e-learning platform with 14 lessons and dozens of supplemental activities that you can use synchronously and asynchronously with students. We’ll also discuss strategies for using NLP’s weekly newsletter, The Sift®, with students, and we’ll take a tour of NLP’s educator resources library and the NewsLit Nation forum.

Register for NLP’s fall webinar series here.

With your registration, you will have access to all four webinars as well as the recordings. NLP will provide a certificate of attendance for those educators who join the live webinars.  If you have any questions, please contact NLP’s Professional Learning team at pd@newslit.org.

NewsLitCamp with The 19th*

NewsLitCamp  is an immersive, free professional learning experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) led by journalists and news literacy experts, designed to develop expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the news reporting process. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape and demystify what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Sign up today (it’s FREE!) to reserve your seat!

When: Aug 27, 2021 08:30 AM CST

Who can attend: This NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists in the U.S. Space permitting, we also will welcome school administrators, post-secondary and international educators.

Please email newslitcamp@newslit.org with questions.

This event is made possible with support from the Google News Initiative and is part of a series of NewsLitCamp events led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.