San José educators: NewsLitCamp® with NBC Bay Area

NewsLitCamp helps teachers & librarians develop expertise in news literacy, demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from misinfo.

NewsLitCamp with NBC Bay Area

About this Event

Join the News Literacy Project (NLP), the San José Public Library and NBC Bay Area on Dec. 2 and 3 for a virtual, teacher-centered NewsLitCamp featuring breakout sessions with local journalists. This program is part of a series of NewsLitCamp events led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.

Sign up here (it’s FREE!) to reserve your seat!

NewsLitCamp is a free professional development experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) and educator-driven planning time to empower you to teach news literacy. This format gives education professionals an opportunity to come together for a day of conversations with journalists and news literacy experts. Check out our NewsLitCamp video below for a quick look at what the event can offer you.

Details

Join us for several hours of free workshops and interactions with NBC Bay Area anchors, reporters and experts from the News Literacy Project. After registering on Eventbrite, educators will be prompted to create a Sched.com account, which will be the home base for all of the event activities, including access to the Zoom links on the day of the event.

Sessions will be held on Wed. and Thurs. Dec. 2 and 3 from 3-6 p.m. PT.

Why attend? As an educator, you directly influence how your students process everything they read, watch and hear. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape. Our goal is to help teachers and librarians develop expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the newsgathering process — demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Participating educators will receive a certificate of attendance so they can apply for continuing education credits within their districts.

Who can attend: NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists. Space permitting, we also will welcome school administrators and post-secondary and international educators. Please email newslitcamp@newslit.org with questions.

Bonus: You’ll learn about our Checkology® virtual classroom, a free cutting-edge comprehensive e-learning platform that complements educators’ lesson plans. The topics it examines include:

  • Misinformation and bias.
  • The practice of quality journalism.
  • The First Amendment.
  • Watchdog journalism and its contributions to democracy.
  • Press freedoms around the world.

About NBC Bay Area

Owned by NBC Universal, NBC Bay Area/KNTV is the Bay Area’s investigative station located in the heart of Silicon Valley. The station is committed to providing continuous, in-depth journalism with unique personalities. Along with broadcasting NBC’s award-winning daytime, prime-time and late-night programming, NBC Bay Area produces more than 32 hours of news programming each week for television along with continuous news coverage at nbcbayarea.com and multiple other digital platforms.

About SJPL

San José Public Library enriches lives by fostering lifelong learning and by ensuring that every member of the community has access to a vast array of ideas and information.


This NewsLitCamp is presented by the News Literacy Project and is sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Top photo: Educators with business reporter Shwanika Narayan at our NewsLitCamp at the San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 2019. Photo Credit: Miriam Romais / The News Literacy Project.

“Is That A Fact?”: An Analysis of Misinformation and the Election

An Analysis of Misinformation and the Election

For a better understanding of how misinformation and disinformation have impacted this election, please join us for a live episode of our podcast Is that a fact? on Wednesday, Nov. 18, at 5:30 p.m. ET. Host Darragh Worland will moderate a lively conversation featuring Enrique Acevedo of 60 in 6 (former anchor at Univision) and an NLP board member, Jane Lytvynenko of BuzzFeed News, and Joan Donovan, research director at Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy.

Register today on Zoom.

All educators: NewsLitCamp® with The Texas Tribune

NewsLitCamp helps teachers & librarians develop expertise in news literacy, demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from misinformation

About this event

NewsLitCamp is now nationwide! Join the News Literacy Project (NLP) and The Texas Tribune on Thursday, Dec. 10, for our first nationwide — and virtual — teacher-centered NewsLitCamp featuring breakout sessions with Texas Tribune journalists. This program is part of a series of NewsLitCamp events led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.

Register here (it’s FREE!) on Eventbrite.

Space is limited. Sign up today to reserve your seat!

NewsLitCamp is a free professional development experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) and educator-driven planning time to empower you to teach news literacy. This format gives education professionals an opportunity to come together for a day of conversations and learning with journalists and news literacy experts.

Details

Educators will convene on Zoom for several hours of free workshops and interactions with Texas Tribune journalists and experts from the News Literacy Project.

Sessions will be held at 8:30-11:45 a.m. and 1:30-3:45 p.m. CT.

Why attend? As an educator, you directly influence how your students process everything they read, watch and hear. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape. Our goal is to help teachers and librarians develop expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the news-gathering process — demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Participating educators will receive a certificate of attendance so they can apply for continuing education credits within their districts.

Who can attend: NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists. Space permitting, we also will welcome school administrators and post-secondary and international educators. Please email newslitcamp@newslit.org with questions.

Bonus: You’ll learn about our Checkology® virtual classroom, a cutting-edge comprehensive e-learning platform that complements educators’ lesson plans. Among the topics it covers are:

  • Misinformation and bias.
  • The practice of quality journalism.
  • The First Amendment.
  • Watchdog journalism and its contributions to democracy.
  • Press freedoms around the world.

About The Texas Tribune

The Texas Tribune is the only member-supported, digital-first, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.


This NewsLitCamp is presented by the News Literacy Project and is sponsored by SmartNews.

Photo: Educators at our NewsLitCamp at Bloomberg News in New York City, Jan. 2020. Photo Credit: Andrea Lin / The News Literacy Project.

edWeb Webinar: “Teaching Disinformation in 2020: CIA Tips for Students and Educators”

In this virtual edWebinar on Oct. 14, join subject matter expert Peter Adams of the News Literacy Project and former CIA officer and author Cindy Otis for a conversation about the difference between misinformation and disinformation.

Register here for this free presentation at edWeb.

Learn how to tell if a bot or a troll is behind the online content you see and what to do about it. Plus, dive into the information landscape surrounding the 2020 elections and political campaigns. Along with highlighting resources, including the award-winning Checkology® virtual classroom, participants will learn strategies for honing news literacy skills using timely, real-world examples. Live attendees will have an opportunity to participate in a book giveaway of True or False by Cindy Otis. Come be a part of creating a “future founded on facts” for your students!

Miami educators: NewsLitCamp® with Univision

Miami-area educators, join the News Literacy Project for a virtual NewsLitCamp® event!

NLC banner with Univision 2020

About this Event

Join the News Literacy Project (NLP), Univision News and Miami-Dade County Public Schools on Oct. 23 for a virtual teacher-centered NewsLitCamp featuring breakout sessions with Univision News journalists. This program is one in a national series of NewsLitCamps led by the News Literacy Project in collaboration with a diverse group of news organizations around the country.

Register here (It’s FREE!) on Eventbrite.

Space is limited. Sign up today to reserve your seat!

NewsLitCamp is a free professional development experience primarily for middle and high school educators. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) and educator-driven planning time to empower you to teach news literacy. This format gives education professionals an opportunity to come together for a day of conversations with journalists and news literacy experts. Check out our NewsLitCamp video for a quick look at what the day can offer you and your students.

Details

Educators will convene on Zoom for several hours of free workshops and interactions with Univision reporters and editors, and experts from the News Literacy Project.

Sessions will be held at 8:30-11:45 a.m. and 1:30-3:45 p.m. ET.

Why attend? As an educator, you directly influence how your students process everything they read, watch and hear. You’ll leave NewsLitCamp with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex and challenging information landscape. Our goal is to develop teachers’ and librarians’ expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the newsgathering process — demystifying what distinguishes quality journalism from rumors, hoaxes and other types of misinformation.

Miami-Dade County Public School educators: please be sure to utilize your M-DCPS email address when registering in order to receive master plan points.

Who can attend: NewsLitCamp is designed primarily for middle and high school teachers and media specialists. Space permitting, we welcome other educators and school administrators.

Bonus: You’ll learn about our Checkology® virtual classroom, a cutting-edge comprehensive e-learning platform that complements educators’ lesson plans. The topics it examines include:

  • Misinformation and bias.
  • The practice of quality journalism.
  • The First Amendment.
  • Watchdog journalism and its contributions to democracy.
  • Press freedoms around the world.

About Univision Communications Inc.

Univision is the leading media company serving Hispanic America. The company’s broadcast assets include Univision Network, one of the top television networks in the U.S. regardless of language and the most-watched Spanish-language broadcast network in the country; Univision Local Media, which owns and/or operates 65 television stations and 58 radio stations in major U.S. Hispanic markets and Puerto Rico; and Univision.com, the most-visited Spanish-language website among U.S. Hispanics. The award-winning news division of Univision Communications Inc. is committed to informing the country’s fastest-growing segment across all media platforms. Hispanics count on the latest and most relevant content that impacts the community through Noticiero Univision, the network’s evening, late evening and weekend national newscast; the Sunday public affairs program Al Punto (To The Point); newsmagazine shows Aquí y Ahora (Here and Now) and Primer Impacto (First Impact); as well as morning news segments on Despierta América (Wake Up America). Univision News has strengthened its news team and expanded its operations by adding investigative, documentary, infographics and data journalism units.


This NewsLitCamp is presented by the News Literacy Project and is sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Photo: Aquí y Ahora correspondent Tifani Rogers with educators at our NewsLitCamp at Univision in Miami, April 2019. Photo Credit: Miriam Romais / The News Literacy Project.

Lunch and Learn: News Literacy for All

Students in a classroom with text: "A future founded on facts"

Join us on Oct. 8 for a Lunch and Learn with Peter Adams, NLP’s senior vice president of education.

Register now on Zoom to attend.

Peter will explore recent trends in viral misinformation and how to spot them. He will introduce resources for debunking falsehoods and strategies for talking with friends and family members who share them online.

Misinformation and a lack of news literacy in the United States have created a crisis — an existential threat to our democracy.

That is why the News Literacy Project is thrilled to be expanding our commitment to news literacy education beyond the classroom! This fall, NLP unveiled free tools and resources that are accessible to all, including a customized version of our signature e-learning platform, Checkology®. All of these resources will help the public learn how to identify credible information, seek out reliable sources, understand both media bias as well as their own, and apply critical thinking skills to differentiate fact-based content from falsehoods.

Checkology Office Hours are now open

Checkology Office Hours

Sign up to attend on Zoom at this link.

Join us on the last Thursday of each month at 1:30 p.m. PT/ 4:30 p.m. ET to learn more about the News Literacy Project’s Checkology virtual classroom.

Hear about recent platform updates, new resources, and commonly asked user questions. Each webinar will contain a live Q&A at the end to answer your questions!

Fall News Literacy Professional Development Series

Fall News Literacy Series: Skills students must learn to be reliably informed

SmartNews

The News Literacy Project is holding a series of four free webinars, addressing essential news literacy topics, every Tuesday in October (Oct. 6, 13, 20, and 27) at 5 p.m. ET/2 p.m. PT. We are allotting 60 minutes for each session, plus an optional 30minute Q&A to ensure we are able to address all questions. Following each webinar, we will share the recording, as well as additional links and free resources via email. Attendees will also receive a certificate of participation for professional development credit.  

Register for the series on Zoom at this link.

This series is generously sponsored by SmartNews.

Session Descriptions

Oct. 6: What it means to be ‘news-literate’: Introduction to news literacy education

We’ll provide an overview of the news literacy skills that students must know to be reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying misinformation, evaluating evidence, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and discerning various types and forms of bias. 

Here’s the video recording of this session:

Oct. 13: Exploring the misinformation landscape

Learn how to teach students to stop using the phrase “fake news” and to identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they regularly encounter. We use examples of misinformation to engage students in news literacy and civic learning, and introduce digital verification tools for debunking manipulated and false images. We also explain the standards of quality journalism, such as fairness, balance and context. 

Here’s the video recording of the session:

Oct. 20: Teaching digital verification to spark news literacy learning

Dive into the tools and skills needed to verify the authenticity of information and learn to create engaging fact-checking investigations that inspire students to investigate viral content. Topics include using reverse image searches to determine authenticity; researching domain registration to discover a website’s owner; using archivers to explore deleted or changed content; developing keen observation skills to detect false context; and using Google Street View to confirm locations. Access to News Literacy Project resources and classroom-ready examples is included. 

Here’s the recording of the session:

Oct. 27: Understanding bias: A nuanced approach to a vital news literacy topic

Bias is one of the most controversial and important subjects in news literacy. People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage, but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In this session, we’ll help you teach this vital, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage. 

Here’s the video recording of this session:

Introducing NLP’s May news literacy webinar series

We recently asked educators what they most wanted us to feature in upcoming professional development webinars. Using that feedback, the News Literacy Project is holding a series of four free webinars, addressing essential news literacy topics, every Thursday in May (May 7, 14, 21 and 28) at 2 p.m. ET/11 a.m. PT.

We are allotting 60 minutes for each session, plus an optional 30 minutes to ensure we are able to address all questions during the Q&A period. Following each webinar, we will share the recording as well as additional links and resources via email.

What it means to be ‘news-literate’: The skills students need to know – May 7th

We’ll provide an overview of the news literacy skills that students must learn to be reliably informed, such as recognizing the difference between news and opinion, identifying misinformation, evaluating evidence, using fact-checking and digital verification tools, and discerning various types and forms of bias. (Note: this is a repeat of the previous webinar on April 7th)

Here’s the video recording of this session:


Exploring the misinformation landscape – May 14th

Learn how to teach students to stop using the phrase “fake news” and to identify the many types of misleading, inaccurate and false information that they encounter every day. We use examples of misinformation to engage students in news literacy and civic learning, and we introduce digital verification skills and tools for debunking manipulated and false images. We also explain the standards of quality journalism, such as fairness, verification, balance and context.

Here’s the video recording of this session:


Teaching digital verification to spark news literacy learning – May 21st

Dive deep into the tools and skills needed to verify the authenticity of information, and learn to create engaging fact-checking investigations that inspire students to investigate viral content. Topics include using reverse image searches to determine authenticity; researching domain registration to discover a website’s owner; using archivers to explore deleted or changed content; developing keen observation skills to detect false context; and using Google Street View to confirm locations. Access to News Literacy Project resources and classroom-ready examples is included.

Here’s the video recording of this session:


Understanding bias: A nuanced approach to a vital news literacy topic – May 28th

Bias is one of the most controversial and important subjects in news literacy. People frequently perceive and allege bias in news coverage — but what does this really mean? What makes a piece of news biased, and who decides? What role do our own biases play in our perceptions of bias? In this session, we’ll help you teach this vital, complex topic in ways that empower students to meaningfully evaluate the fairness and impartiality of news coverage.

Here’s the video recording of this session:

COVID-19 in Context: News Coverage and News Literacy in Uncertain Times

Join the News Literacy Project and the University of Rhode Island’s Metcalf Institute for a four-part webinar series, COVID-19 in Context: News Coverage, News Literacy & Scientific Uncertainty. The series will explore one of the most urgent science communication challenges of our lives through the insights of journalists, news literacy education experts and scientists.

Beginning April 23, we will discuss the experiences of journalists who are covering this evolving pandemic and the challenges of cutting through misinformation — while providing you with the tips and tools to do so, too. We’ll close the series with a discussion about the specific communication challenges posed by all the uncertainties around COVID-19 and how to look for reliable sources to help clarify the unknowns.

You can participate in one or more of the webinars and submit your questions to panelists in the latter part of each session.

The webinars are free; registration is required.

We hope you will join us.

Webinar 1: News Coverage in a Pandemic

View webinar recording

April 23, 1 p.m. EDT
COVID-19 represents an unusual challenge for the press. Journalists from small and large outlets and beat and general assignment reporters, they all must cover a rapidly changing story that integrates science, public health, economics, policy, and politics. As newsrooms struggle with understaffing and a lack of experienced science reporters, how are they managing this challenge? In this webinar, speakers will share an overview of COVID-19 news coverage and describe their experiences reporting on this crisis.

Speakers:

Webinar 2: 10 Critical News Literacy Skills

View webinar recording

News literacy presentation

April 28, 1 p.m. EDT
Being able to tell fact from fiction is critical right now. The coronavirus pandemic has necessitated rapid dissemination of information from many sources, including government officials, the news media and social media. How can you be sure you are getting accurate information? This webinar will identify 10 critical news literacy skills to help you be a smart, active consumer of news and other information.

Speaker: John Silva, director of education, News Literacy Project

Webinar 3: Digital Forensics — How to Fact Check Like a Pro

View webinar recording

Digital forensics presentation

April 30, 1 p.m. EDT
Building on the 10 critical news literacy skills of the previous webinar, this presentation will introduce participants to some of the tactics that purveyors of misinformation commonly employ, then demonstrate how to use a variety of free online tools to debunk false content like a pro. Participants will learn how to use critical observation skills, reverse image search engines, lateral reading strategies, web archivers and basic geolocation tools to determine the authenticity, original context and source of viral content.

Speaker: Peter Adams, senior vice president of education, News Literacy Project

Webinar 4: Countering Misinformation in a Crisis: Making Sense of Science during COVID-19

View webinar recording

Suzannah Gonzales’ presentation

May 5, 1 p.m. EDT
Because COVID-19 is so new, scientists and medical professionals are still working to answer many basic questions about its spread and treatment. Even as the research advances every day, the scientific uncertainties and unclear communication make it easy to spread misinformation.  Information about COVID-19 is spreading so quickly that some have described this as an “infodemic.” Webinar speakers will discuss how to understand these uncertainties and actively counter misinformation.

Speakers:

  • Suzannah Gonzales, associate director of education, News Literacy Project
  • Brandon Ogbunu, assistant professor, Brown University
  • Leysia Palen, professor of computer science and professor and founding chair of the Department of Information Science, University of Colorado

     

About the Metcalf Institute

The University of Rhode Island’s Metcalf Institute provides education, training and resources for journalists, researchers, and other science communicators to engage diverse audiences in conversations about science and the environment. Metcalf Institute was established at the University of Rhode Island in 1997 with funding from three media foundations: the Belo Corporation, the Providence Journal Charitable Foundation and the Philip L. Graham Fund, with additional support from the Telaka Foundation.

NLP webinar: What does it mean to be ‘news-literate’?

 

John Silva presenting at a NewsLitCamp.

Educators and parents: If school closures mean that you’re teaching students through distance learning or homeschooling, join NLP for a one-hour webinar on Tuesday, April 7, starting at 1 p.m ET / 10 a.m. PT.

The ability to sort fact from fiction — to identify reliable sources of information and recognize misinformation — has taken on new significance as we grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and the torrent of misinformation that has arisen about it. News literacy skills empower students to successfully traverse today’s challenging and complex information landscape.

Register now (it’s free!): bit.ly/10skillswebinar

This webinar features 10 key news literacy skills that students need to know to become reliably informed, such as identifying misinformation, applying fact-checking and digital verification skills and tools, recognizing the standards of quality journalism, and building a healthy “news diet” from a variety of credible media sources.

Whatever your experience in teaching news literacy, you’ll be inspired by this webinar, which provides clear learning objectives and resources for integrating these skills and tools into curricula across subject areas and grade levels. We will share relevant, real-world examples and provide FREE Premium student licenses for NLP’s Checkology® virtual classroom — which is uniquely suited for remote learning — that are valid through June 30. (U.S. educators/parents only).


Photo caption: NLP’s John Silva, NBCT, with educators at our NewsLitCamp® at Richland Two Institute of Innovation in Columbia, SC, January 17, 2020. (Andrea Lin / The News Literacy Project)

POSTPONED: Detroit educators: NewsLitCamp® with WXYZ-TV Channel 7 and the Detroit Free Press

This event has been postponed indefinitely due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Please check back later for information on a new date.


Join the News Literacy Project, WXYZ-TV Channel 7, the Detroit Free Press and Detroit Public Schools Community District for a highly engaging, educator-centered NewsLitCamp featuring breakout sessions with local journalists.

Registration details coming soon!

NewsLitCamp is a day-long professional development experience based on an “edcamp” style of continuing education. It features topical sessions (selected with input from participants) and educator-driven planning and development time to empower you to teach news literacy. This format gives education professionals an opportunity to come together for a day of conversations with journalists and news literacy experts.

Detroit NLC 2020

Details

Educators will meet at WXYZ-TV Channel 7 on Saturday, May 16, for a full day of free workshops and interactions with experts from the News Literacy Project and journalists from WXYZ-TV Channel 7 and the Detroit Free Press. WXYZ-TV Channel 7 is located at 20777 West 10 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075.

Breakfast and networking begin at 8 a.m.; NewsLitCamp starts promptly at 8:30 a.m. Lunch will be provided.

Why attend?

As an educator, you directly influence how your students process what they read, watch and hear. At the end of our NewsLitCamp, you’ll leave with new ideas, skills and resources to help your students navigate today’s complex information landscape and beat back a rising tide of misinformation. Our goal is to develop teachers’ and librarians’ expertise in news literacy education, share specialized teaching resources and provide a behind-the-scenes view of the news reporting process. These sessions aim to demystify and explain what distinguishes quality journalism.

Check out our NewsLitCamp video for a quick look at what the day can offer you and your students.

Who can attend

NewsLitCamps are designed primarily for middle school and high school teachers and media specialists. Space permitting, we welcome other educators and school administrators.

Bonus: You’ll learn about our Checkology® virtual classroom, a cutting-edge comprehensive news literacy e-learning platform that complements educators’ lesson plans. The topics it examines include:

  • Misinformation.
  • Bias.
  • The practice of quality journalism.
  • The First Amendment.
  • Watchdog journalism and its contributions to democracy.
  • Press freedoms around the world.

This NewsLitCamp is presented by the News Literacy Project and is supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation with additional promotional support offered by the Michigan State University School of Journalism.

Photo Caption: Educators at our NewsLitCamp in Columbia, South Carolina, January 2020.

Photo Credit: Andrea Lin/News Literacy Project.